Information Transfer Policy

by Elina D

Information transfer policy refers to the set of procedures and rules governing the movement of information between different levels of an organisation. It is designed to protect the confidentiality of the information and ensure its accuracy and integrity. The primary purpose of the information transfer policy is to ensure that the information is transferred safely and securely from one level to another within the organisation.

It also helps to ensure that the information is accurate and complete before transferring it. Information transfer policy also helps to prevent unauthorised access to the information. This policy aims to ensure that information is transferred in a way that protects its confidentiality, integrity, and availability. To this end, all employees must follow the procedures outlined in this policy when transferring information.


There are three types of information transfer:

  • Physical transfer- this includes transferring information via hard copy (e.g., printouts, USB drives, etc.), electronic transfer (e.g., email, file sharing platforms), or verbal transfer (e.g., face-to-face conversation, phone call).
  • Logical transfer includes transferring information between computer systems, organisation-owned systems, and personal devices.
  • Technical transfer includes transferring information via CCTV, access control systems, or other security systems.

Procedures to be followed while transferring information

The following procedures must be followed when transferring information:

  • When transferring physical information, employees must take measures to protect the confidentiality of the information (e.g., by using a secure envelope or bag). If the information is particularly sensitive, employees should consult with their supervisor before making the transfer.
  • When transferring logical information, employees must ensure that the destination system has appropriate security measures in place to protect the confidentiality of the information (e.g., by encrypting the data). Employees should also consider whether it is necessary to transfer the information electronically and, if so, whether it is possible to use a secure file-sharing platform. If the answer to both questions is yes, then the employee should proceed with the transfer. Otherwise, they should consult with their supervisor.
    • When transferring technical information, employees must ensure that the destination system has appropriate security measures in place to protect the confidentiality of the information (e.g., by implementing access control measures). Employees should also consider whether it is necessary to transfer the information electronically and, if so, whether it is possible to use a secure file-sharing platform. If the answer to both questions is yes, then the employee should proceed with the transfer. Otherwise, they should consult with their supervisor.

      Transfer Information Policy

      ISO27001 guidelines to transfer information

      As part of your organisation's information security management system (ISMS), you need to have processes and controls in place to ensure the security of your information when it is transferred outside of your organisation. The international standard for information security management, ISO/IEC 27001, provides guidelines for how to do this. This blog post will cover the critical points of ISO/IEC 27001 that you need to know to transfer information securely.

      1. Establish a policy for information transfers

      The first step is to establish a policy for information transfers. This policy should address the following:

      • What type of information can be transferred outside of the organisation

      This policy should specify what information can be transferred and any restrictions on what kind of information can be transferred. For example, you may only allow certain types of information to be transferred outside of the organisation, or you may restrict the transfer of certain types of sensitive data.

      • Who is authorised to transfer information?

      This policy should specify who is authorised to transfer information and how they are allowed to do so. For example, you may require all employees to get approval from their supervisor before transferring any information outside the organisation.

      2. Encrypt all information that is transferred outside of your organisation

      Anytime you transfer information outside of your organisation, it is important to encrypt the data to protect it from being accessed by unauthorised individuals. There are many different encryption methods, so you'll need to choose the one that best meets your needs.

      3. Make sure you have a way to track who has access to the information-

      You must know who has access to the information that you are transferring. This can be done by keeping track of the IP addresses of the computers accessing the information. You should also have a log of all activity on the system.

      Transfer Information Policy

      What should you include in your Information transfer policy?

      • Determine the type of information- First, the organisation should consider what information needs to be protected. This will likely include any confidential or trade secret information. The organisation should also consider what type of information does not need to be protected. For example, publicly available information or information already in the public domain does not need to be protected.
      • Parties involved in information transfer- It is crucial to mention the parties involved in the information transfer process. The first party involved in information transfer is the sender. The sender is responsible for providing accurate and complete information to the recipient. The sender needs to consider the audience when sending information. The second party involved in information transfer is the recipient. Recipients are responsible for receiving and understanding the information sent to them. In some cases, recipients may be required to act based on the information received.
      • Awareness training on information transfer- Awareness training is essential because it helps employees understand the importance of protecting information. It also helps them understand their role in protecting information. For example, if employees are responsible for handling confidential information, they need to know how to protect it adequately. Awareness training can also help employees identify potential threats to information and how to report them.
      • Law and Jurisdiction- The volume of data that is now transferred internationally daily is staggering. This raises several complex legal issues, including jurisdiction and law enforcement questions. When it comes to information transfer policy, the law is concerned with two main issues: data privacy and data security. Data privacy laws govern how personal information can be collected, used, and disclosed. They vary from country to country, but most data privacy laws require organisations to consent before collecting, using or disclosing personal information.